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Metals Education

 

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GOLD 

An enduring element found naturally in a distinct yellow color. Gold has an extraordinary heritage with unique qualities. Gold is resistant to rust, tarnish, and corrosion. Although gold is very strong, it's also the most malleable of all precious metals. Pure gold is too soft for everyday wear, so it is alloyed with a mixture of metals like silver, copper, nickel, and zinc to give it strength and durability.

 
 
 
 

SILVER

Relatively soft, very malleable. Pure silver, also called fine silver, is commonly combined with other metals to produce a more durable product. The most popular of these alloys is sterling silver, which consists of 92.5 percent silver and 7.5 percent copper. Although any metal can make up the 7.5 percent non-silver portion of sterling, centuries of experimentation have shown copper to be its best companion, improving the metal's hardness and durability without affecting its beautiful color.

 
 
 
 

TUNGSTEN

Tarnish-resistant with a substantial feel in weight. Tungsten is nearly impossible to scratch or wear down, so even the most delicate details are well-defined and polished after years of wear. Four times harder than titanium, tungsten retains its polish longer than almost any other metal. A practical and beautiful choice for gardeners, or anyone who works actively using their hands.

 
 
 
 

COBALT

A bright white metal that is highly scratch resistant. Made from a highly durable alloy, cobalt is four times harder than platinum while at the same time, less dense. Because of its natural hardness, cobalt jewelry is extremely scratch, chip and corrosion-resistant. Its lower density and natural malleability allow for strong, dynamic designs with less weight. Cobalt is also hypoallergenic, making it an ideal choice for those with sensitive skin or an active lifestyle.

 
 
 
 

PLATINUM

This metal will last forever, making it the ultimate symbol for true, enduring, and everlasting love. Platinum is durable. Its density makes it the most secure setting for your diamond or precious gemstone. All our platinum rings are crafted with platinum prongs for setting loose diamonds. Because platinum is a naturally white metal, re-plating is unnecessary; it will always hold its beauty.

 
 
 
 

PALLADIUM

Palladium is a rare precious metal, treasured for its brilliant silver-white surface that can be polished to a high mirror-like shine. Palladium wedding rings are extremely durable and resistant to tarnishing, extreme heat, and exposure to many types of chemicals. The strength of palladium makes it a preferred metal, along with platinum, for use in ring settings.

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Gibeon Meteorite was formed in space four billion years ago. It exploded upon entering Earth’s atmosphere, landing in the desert of Namibia, Africa in scattered pieces over an area 171 miles long and 62 miles wide. The Namibian government banned the export of Gibeon Meteorite, as any newly discovered pieces are automatically protected as national monuments. This means that any meteorite specimens in circulation are of increasing value and incredibly limited supply. The origin and rarity of each meteorite ring makes it a distinctive piece of art.

 

 

Carbon Fiber

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Lashbrook Carbon Fiber rings utilize authentic, solid Carbon Fiber, unlike most Carbon Fiber rings which feature an imitation product. While they may look nice, these false carbon fiber rings have none of the strength, durability and authenticity of legitimate Carbon Fiber. The raw material used to make Carbon Fiber is a mix of compounds, mostly consisting of carbon ring organic polymers. This material is drawn into long strands, or fibers, and then heated in a controlled environment. The heat causes the atoms in the fibers to vibrate violently until most of the non-carbon atoms are expelled. The material left after the heating process is composed of thin, tightly wound carbon strands which are then processed through stabilization, spinning and weaving.

 

 

Damascus Steel

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This history behind Damascus Steel is one of the most compelling aspects of this metal. Damascus was a type of steel used in the Middle Eastern swordmaking. While the exact origins of the craft are unknown, the blacksmiths producing Damascus became famous for the quality of their superior weaponry. The name Damascus Steel stems from either the original Syrian blacksmiths originating the art or the Damask pattern itself. The technology used to create Damascus Steel became so guarded over the centuries it was eventually lost. Modern scientific study has been able to identify many of the original techniques used, but not completely recreate it. Scientists have found nanowires, carbon nanotubes, exotic microalloying elements and characteristics of superplasticity in ancient Damascus swords. While modern production processes can produce metals with all of these characteristics, the presence of these high-tech elements from an ancient art is what made them so advanced for their time, revered and eventually the source of legend.

 

 

Zirconium

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In its natural state, Zirconium is a silver-grey color. It earns its stark black appearance through Lashbrook’s proprietary heating process, in which a layer of hard black oxide grows on the metal. This black layer is much harder than raw Zirconium, but it is very thin. Unlike oxidized silver and black rhodium, this layer does not rub off over time. It is also more durable than black-coated rings, such as black titanium and black tungsten.

 

 

Elysium

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Elysium black diamond rings are just that – solid diamond. Diamond is the hardest material on earth, rated a 10 on the Mohs scale. It is at least four times harder than tungsten and ten times harder than ceramic. Diamond cannot be scratched, except by another diamond. Elysium is about 10% harder than natural occurring diamond. This means that Elysium diamond rings can be worn for a lifetime and never be scratched unless exposed to another source of diamond material. They are the hardest, most scratch-resistant rings available on Earth.

Using $30 million worth of research and technology, millions of man-made diamond particles are subjected to enormous pressure (1,000,000 PSI) and intense heat (2700 Fahrenheit). Under these extreme conditions, the diamond particles grow together creating an Elysium solid diamond ring. The random alignment or non-symmetrical orientation of the individual crystals during this sintering process produces a solid matrix that does not allow for the reflection of light. This causes Elysium diamond rings to be black in color, which goes all the way through the ring.